Furthermore, the fruits thus far have been bitter, Macbeth

Furthermore,
Macbeth’s thirst for power leads him to become extremely paranoid and mentally
unstable. This is seen when Macbeth conspires to murder Banquo, he states, “to
be thus is nothing, but to be safely thus. Our fears in Banquo stick deep, and
in his royalty of nature. Reigns that which would be feared. Tis much he dares.
In this soliloquy, Macbeth is thinking about the power and abilities Banquo
possess. Macbeth fears that he will lose his power and crown. His desire for
power makes his ambition grow and makes him more bloodthirsty. Joshua Cohen, an
American novelist argues,   

          If fathering a line of kings
makes Banquo (in the words of the Weird Sisters) “lesser than Macbeth, and
greater” (1.3.63), it can only be because Macbeth will be granted no
heirs. Hence, all the fruits of his ambition will die with him. And since all
the fruits thus far have been bitter, Macbeth has sacrificed
everything-reputation, security, peace of mind and future salvation-only to
make the “seed of Banquo” kings… Macbeth now realizes to his
despair that his enthronement was merely an “earnest of a greater
honor” for Banquo’s descendants. This terrible awakening is what provokes him
to order the assassination of Banquo and his son-a futile attempt (owing to
Fleance’s escape) to “cancel and tear to pieces” his “bond”
with fate before its remaining terms can be fulfilled.

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Cohen
states that Macbeth fears that Banquo’s heirs will replace him, and his legacy
will not continue, all his hard work will be worthless at the end. He also
fears that Banquo may know that Macbeth may the murderer as he was with him
when the witches told him about the prophecies and he fears Banquo may betray
him. Macbeth is filled with so much desire and ambition to be king and powerful
that he cannot differentiate between right and wrong. Macbeth has become so
deviant that he can plan and conspire a murder by himself without the help of
lady Macbeth. From here on his fear and ambition lead to a string of murders,
killing many inncocents. Ultimately, his paranoia leads him to find assurance
from the witches. Thus, Macbeth’s ambition for power drives him into paranoia.